Officially Carfree

No more payments, no more oil changes, no more maintenance, no more worrying, no more wrecks, no more headache.  Total logistical freedom (yeah, feel free to argue that point with me, “I’ll pwn U” – as they say on the Internets).

Today I officially signed the title of the 2006 Nissan 350Z over to the knew owners.  May they have awesome fun with the rad little car that it is.  As for me, I just gained so much I can’t even fathom yet.

This selling of the car, has moved me from a mere transit advocate and anti-auto dependency market advocate, but now I am firmly planted 100% in that realm.  It will be an interesting place for a mostly Libertarian person as myself, who believe in the inviolate individual and property rights.  Being that transit has become the stomping grounds of so many socialists, pro-Government control advocates, it shall be an interesting discussion when that is brought up.

Anyway, any entries from hence forth will of course include my slightly altered new reality.  Being without a car may just change my mind a bit about certain things – or not.  I often have a very clear view of the world, politics, and other such things (I believe along with many people telling me the same thing, so it isn’t just my word).  So now I ponder will my perspective change much.

Anyway, it is Friday and I’m rambling through a partial blog entry.  I’m heading off to do something, not sure what, but it will definitely not be in a car!  : )

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14 Comments

  1. Yup, sure is. In all reality though, I have been carfree since before you and I knew each other. The only thing was, is I’ve been paying for it that entire time – the real liberating part is not spending the money anymore. It’s like getting a huge pay increase. 🙂

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  2. I have been debating myself of going carless for some time. I live a bit too far from Portland as well as my work. I live in Milwaukie. I am stuck with paying mortgage. So moving closer is out of question for me at this time. I ride bus alot. I just started riding bicycle. Wait and see how I am doing errands or going someplace by bicycle. Also I need to do checking on carshare like ZipCar. Then I decide whether to let my car go or not.

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  3. Hey H. Yeah, check those things out. You could still go car free in Milwaukee pretty easily. There is decent bus service there. I feel for ya being stuck paying a mortgage though, I made an objective point to avoid a mortgage because I just have not trusted the market for the last 5+ years. I knew it had to burst soon. Now I’m starting to thing about snagging some property though. 🙂

    Best of luck, being car free is seriously liberating. Between Portland’s great transit, living & working close, and things like Zip Car & the insanely cheap car rentals it is super easy to live this way.

    I honestly can’t imagine actually NEEDING a car anymore.

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  4. Congrats, my man… Looking forward to following along to see how the blog progresses with your new way of life.
    With my business, it isn’t possible to go without a car but I am trying to make "baby steps" towards a much different lifestyle than before. I do find myself walking and using our transit systems much more than I ever have and I enjoy it for many reasons.
    Take care,
    Nick

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  5. Thanks Nick!

    Being my residence & work are close, that definitely helps. Most of my traveling is done without a car also, instead I’m usually either flying or taking the train, which also helps a lot.

    I’m hoping to get some more blog posts up, especially of the last two days of the trip, which I can’t seem to finish.

    Keep it rail life! 🙂

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  6. It’s such a great feeling. It took me a little while to get used to being without a car, but I adjusted quickly, and made good use of the extra cash I had in my account.

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  7. I’m definitely putting that cash to good use. Already got some investments lined up. I have a lot of ground to make up after having the car suck up so many depreciating funds for so long. 😦

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  8. Nice post! The conservative/libertarian argument actually should be for the concept of mass transit rather than against it. Unfortunately politics has taken over arguments on both sides of the issue. I’m glad you’re the voice of reason when it comes to this issue, particularly from the libertarian think-tank side which has perverted the concept of "free-markets" and transportation.

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  9. I try. There are people out there that realize the positives and the fact that the transportation sector is highly skewed by politics at this point. Realizing that simple fact helps many people better understand the complexities of any type of major transport project – either Interstates, Highways, rural roads, or rail lines for transit. It is truly a huge soup bowl of confusion in this age. 🙂

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  10. I’d like to join you in this crusade, but alas, I work at TRIMET and the Max does not connect properly nor does it run late enough.

    Ironic, isn’t it?

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  11. Perverse in my opinion. Because TriMet doesn’t have anything like "ride your bike to your job driving the bus", no instead they require an "automobile". There are tons of other nonsense within the "job requirements" of the position too.

    But yeah; ironic, perverse, silly, absurd, there is a whole list of reasons the job is somewhat counter productive to many of the goals TriMet itself is setup and supposed to support.

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  12. I wish I could go completely car free but alas I don’t think my wife would ever go for it although it is now becoming easier now that car sharing has come to Salt Lake City.

    Concerning the situation with drivers and other TRI-Met workers, what UTA did for its people was set up van shuttles to get drivers to work for their early morning shifts and back after late night shifts. The only downside is that you have to be able get to the vans which mainly go from TRAX and park n’ ride lots, however, but as more TOD gets built here it is becoming easier.

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  13. I actually do know a number of people that work for TriMet, that have no car. After they started working for the authority they then sold their vehicle. They either walk or bike to the job, then commence to driver/operate their respective transit vehicle.

    Reply

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