King County Metro (KC Metro) System Maps as of 2022

The following are PDFs of the various areas. There is, as of 2022 a map viewer here.

Everett Transit Maps as of 2022

Systems map page is here. Images of the maps are below, click for larger image. For even larger images, check out the PDF document below the images.

Sound Transit Maps as of 2022, with expansion plans until 2024

The following are the maps in png format, click each for a larger view. For even further detailed views, click any of the PDF links below.

Everett’s Transit Shed

i.e. shed as in “walking shed”, “watershed”, or related concept. Meaning the area that can be traveled within X amount of time. In this particular case I made the starting point the downtown Everett Station, and set the trip time to 25 minutes to see where one could get to or arrive from.

That gave a number of areas, including the majority of Everett and some areas to the south, like Mill Creek, and as far out west as Mukilteo.

Further to the east accessible areas include the western side of Lake Stevens and much of Snohomish.

I was just trying to check out the dry til’ you qualify area in Seattle, which nothing in Seattle is affordable by any means when it comes to a singel family home – everything is well over $600k and the median is closer to a $900k than it is the lower starting range. That lower range generally tends to mean the house would need significant repair or is unlivable.

Further south, the prices become much more reasonable, ableit still vastly higher than the median US price for a house. The added negative south of Seattle is that crime tends to dramatically increase, the necessity to drive more in areas where most of the driving fatalities occur, etc all increase in the souther drive til’ you qualify areas. These include, by name, Tukwila, Auburn, Kent, and even Tacoma.

All of those areas have 25 minute transit sheds, and a 40-60 minute trips from the central transit shed into the city of Seattle.

Opening up Google Maps, which appears a bit clearer and has the landmarks draws an interesting map around Everett and Lake Stevens.

Anyway, that’s my quick survey of the area and a few mentions of housing pricing. Cheerio.

Details on Seattle “Bike Culture”

If you’ve lived in Portland, Oregon and experienced the bike culture there, it’s different. If you’ve lived in Amsterdam or Copenhagen, both of those are respectively different too. If you’ve been to New York City, Austin, New Orleans, San Francisco, or almost any other major city, they too, have a different bike culture. For this post though, I’m going to point out some of the things I have found useful in getting around Seattle, getting involved in “bike culture”, cycling, and generally nerding out on gear or picking up food via bike.

Seattle bike culture centers around a few things that you’ll find we’re all involved with in some way. There are the obvious things such as attempting to mitigate paying to keep cars away from people trying to walk, ride, or carry on with their lives since they’re an ongoing imminent threat in this country. Then there are the things that might not be obvious to the newcomer to this city. The first thing you should familiarize yourself with is Seattle geography.

You might think to yourself, “I’m no good with geography?”, and simply put, Seattle doesn’t give two shits how bad you are with geography it is a necessity in order to navigate around this city. There’s the platted standard American grid, which is great, but it ends at various points because of geographic reasons – such as a giant hill might be in the way, or a sheer face of a rocky cliff, or a giant body of water. Whatever the case, one does not simply just traverse Seattle’s geography directly, there is often, and almost always some type of mitigation in between two points. A bridge, some steps, a switchback, you name it you’ll end up dealing with these things.

Might I add though, all of these things can make getting around by bike in Seattle awesome! A few moments where I thought to myself, “wow, cycling here is pretty bad ass” include;

  • The moment I traveled from Ballard (and outterlying neighborhood that used to be a different town) to downtown Seattle in 27 minutes, mostly by trail (not bike lane, not protected bike lane, but by trail!). To note, the awesome thing is I did not hurry, I did not hustle, I did not “go fast”. I just rode, and to cover the same distance during rush hour by driving takes people about ~30-65 minutes, taking the express bus is about 35 minutes, the regular local busses are between 40-55 minutes, and of course here I was at a consistent, enjoyable, epic scenery, beautiful path, chill riders, and ready for the day at 27 minutes! Of course, depending on where you are and all, things are different, but in many places you can easily bike into or out of the city as fast or faster than someone attempting to drive.
  • Years ago, and this actually first occurred in Portland when I had moved to the northwest, but I still ponder this thought regularly today, “Wow, so this is the rain here. Enjoyably piddly rain, a mere rain jacket (not coat, just a jacket, like a hoodie) is rather fine for this placid mist. Now here, where I stand inside, and I’ve already ended up drying off.” Once I realized that the rain is generally, almost always, not heavy and doesn’t drench us, a few minor mitigations like a hoodie and maybe some water resistant shoes and it was no longer much of a concern.
  • Mountains to the left in the distances, mountain to the right, mountains in the distance to the front and to the back of me. This is scenery I can enjoy every day! Oh and look at that, there stands Mount Rainier in its glorious, magnificent way! To boot, Seattle has multiple roads and pedestrians plazas strategically placed around the city that face – on purpose – the glorious Mount Rainier and they are magnificent to enjoy!

Of course, that’s just the few I’ve mentioned here, I could elaborate about how awesome it is to ride regularly for all sorts of reasons throughout the City of Seattle and the surrounding area. But instead of me going on and on about how awesome Seattle is for people who like to actively transport themselves from one place to another, and all the while do it efficiently and entertainingly, here are those details about things I’ve found useful.

In addition to the above, here are some articles I’ve enjoyed and thought insightful.

Not Specifically Bike Related but Connected

Nerdy Stuff, APIs, and Bike Data

Seattle Bike Map

I’ve probably missed things that are of excellent usefulness, if something comes to mind, do comment with a link to additional resources!